8 Women-Centered Travel Sites

1. Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historic Park

Rosie the Riveter Visitor Education Center

By NPS Photos

Richmond, California

Educational and interactive exhibits of Rosie the Riveter and World War II.

Official Website

2. Jane Addams Hull House Museum

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Chicago, Illinois

Hull House was a settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. Located in the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Hull House opened its doors to recently arrived European immigrants and is now open for public tours and events.

Official Website

3. Women’s Rights National Historic Park

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Seneca Falls, New York

The museum (also called Visitor Center) is the home base of the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, New York. The museum is two floors. The first floor contains a theater, park ranger station with lots of information, a gift shop, and 20 life-size bronze statues of the organizers and supporters of the first women’s convention that took place next door in Wesleyan Chapel in 1848.

Check out Kate Chaplin’s Travel Story including pictures and videos.

Official Website

4. Susan B. Anthony House

Susan-B-Anthony-House-Parkinson-Cafe-field-trip-on-April-23-2010

Rochester, New York

Susan B. Anthony was a leader in the abolition movement, the temperance movement, and women’s rights. Home includes, highlights of Susan B. Anthony’s life, including early influences, the many reforms she championed (suffrage, abolition, temperance, and education), her friendship with Frederick Douglass, and her trial for voting in 1872.

Official Website

IMG_1439Consider a 12 minute drive to Mount Hope Cemetery (Susan B. Anthony and Fredrick Douglass graves) 1133 Mt Hope Ave, Rochester, NY 14620
Allow as much time as you need to pay your respects. No admission fees but there are open gate hours listed on Google.

Check out Kate Chaplin’s Travel Story. 

5. Harriet Tubman House and Museum

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Auburn, New York

Harriet Tubman was a remarkable rebel who not only escaped from slavery but went back to lead over 1,000 more men, woman and children to freedom. On the site is a museum and tours of the Home for the Aged. Currently Harriet’s Home is undergoing repairs.

Check out the Your Gal Friday Podcast on Harriet  (coming July 7) as well as Kate Chaplin’s Travel Story about visiting Harriet’s Home.

Official Website

6. Maggie L. Walker Home National Historical Site

maggie l walker

Richmond, Virginia

Maggie Lena Walker devoted her life to civil rights advancement, economic empowerment, and educational opportunities for Jim Crow-era African Americans and women. As a bank president, newspaper editor, and fraternal leader, Walker served as an inspiration of pride and progress. Today, Walker’s home is preserved as a tribute to her enduring legacy of vision, courage, and determination.

Official Website

7. Sewall-Belmont House & Belmont-Paul Museum

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Washington D.C.

The headquarters of the National Woman’s Party since 1929, the site offers programs and special tours. The museum also contains Susan B. Anthony’s desk and a banner used during the first U.S. protests demanding women’s enfranchisement.

Official Website

8. Clara Barton National Historical Site

Clara_Barton's_Home,_Glen_Echo,_Maryland_LCCN2011631520.tif

By Carol M. Highsmith – Library of Congress Catalog: Public Domain,

Glen Echo, Maryland

Clara Barton is the founder of the American Red Cross. Her 38-room home and 9 acres of the grounds are managed by the George Washington Memorial Parkway. The site is dedicated to Clara’s accomplishments and preserves the early history of the American Red Cross.

The site is currently closed for restoration but plans to re-open in 2017.

Official Website 

 

 

 

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